Cincinnati Spine Institute
Practice Areas index

Lumbar Disc Herniation
With age, your disks become flatter and less cushiony. If a disk becomes too weak, the outer part may tear. The inside part of the disk pushes through the tear and presses on the nerves beside it. When part of a disk presses on a nerve, it can cause pain in both the back and the legs. The location of the pain depends on which disk is weak.

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Cervical Disc Herniation
As you age, the center of the cervical disc may start to lose water content, making the disc less effective as a cushion. As a disc deteriorates, the outer layer can also tear. This can allow displacement of the disc's center through a crack in the outer layer, into the space occupied by the nerves and spinal cord. The herniated disc can then press on the nerves and cause pain, numbness, tingling or weakness in the shoulders or arms.

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Radiculopathy
An injury near the root of a nerve could result in pain at the end of the nerve, where sensation is felt. That's because the nerves that extend out from between the cervical vertebrae provide sensation and trigger movement in these areas, this condition is called cervical radiculopathy. Several conditions can put pressure on nerve roots in the neck. The most common causes for cervical radiculopathy are a herniated cervical disk, spinal stenosis, and degenerative disk disease.

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